Environment Finance Human Rights Politics

OU College Republicans and College Democrats face off in debate

Photo by Rachel Niemi
Written by Nicole Rhoads

The Ohio University College Republicans and the College Democrats debated economic, social and environmental issues Thursday at Morton Hall.

The OU Economics Society organized the event with the Campus Involvement Center and The New Political, and three members from both College Republicans and College Democrats participated in the event on behalf of their groups. President Sam Kissinger of the Economics Society and Editor-in-Chief Olivia Miltner of The New Political and moderated the two-hour debate.

Foreign policy and economic recession raised heated discussion between the participants. When it came to foreign policy, the College Republicans stood firm with the idea that border control, whether it be a wall or otherwise, is the best way to fix the illegal immigrant problem. The College Democrats said making citizenship easier was a better option.

Renewable energy sources and racial inequality also drew conversation from not only the two debating groups but also the audience. When it came to renewable energy resources, the College Democrats said the country cannot rely on fossil fuels. The College Republicans, however, said renewable energy sources are currently not economically sustainable and that abundant fossil fuels should be used to help keep the country afloat.

Although there were many questions that caused debate, some issues turned bipartisan. Those issues were same-sex marriage, transgender rights, marijuana legalization and PAC spending for presidential campaigns. Both parties were able to come to an agreement that presidential campaigns should not be spending so much money. Both groups said the money being used to fund campaigns could be put to better use.

The moderators announced two five minute breaks in between sections of the debate. During the breaks the lecture hall was buzzing with conversation.

“It was a cool thing to come to,” Olivia Gatto, a debate attendee, said. “It’s great that people can come together different views and all.”

Students were voicing their opinions and tweeting questions to the groups via the hashtag #OUDebates. Comments on the twitter hashtag ranged from students counter-arguing statements from the parties to providing questions for the moderators.

Participants encouraged the crowd to vote March 15 in the Ohio primary.    

About the author

Nicole Rhoads

Leave a Comment