Photo Essays Politics

OU students making history at the Women’s March on Washington

Written by Olivia Miltner

Ohio University students, faculty and staff trekked to Washington D.C. this weekend to witness history — attending Donald Trump’s presidential inauguration, the Women’s March on Washington, or both.

Follow a few OU students as they joined hundreds of thousands of people in the capitol Saturday for the largest rally in U.S. history.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

The Women’s March on Washington organizers wrote on their Facebook page that they wanted to send “a bold message to our new administration on their first day in office, and to the world, that women’s rights are human rights. We stand together, recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us.”

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

“I’m marching because I was upset about the presidential election, and I felt like this was a good space to voice why I was upset and hopefully meet some like-minded and opposing views to work through these problems and fight misogyny.” -Annie Chester, a senior studying classics and world religions and global studies at Ohio University.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

A group of women gather on the National Mall during the Women’s March.They were part of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, which represents over 500,000 people.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

“I really do oppose the Trump agenda across the board, specifically with women’s rights but really on most things, so I feel like I had to add another body to the count. It’s about women’s rights, but it’s also sort of the anti-inauguration, which I’m glad to be a part of.” -Nick Brumfield, an OU alumnus.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

“I hope to start coming to more of these, actually. This is my first time really. I hope this isn’t the last time. I think I understand now the way that when people get together and the energy of a big group of people…basically motivates people to do things, not just to come back to these but to do things on their own time…so I think it’s really inspiring to come here for the first time and see something like this person.” -Henry Wang, who was convinced to come to the Women’s March by Brumfield.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

“I felt like it was important to be here as a man just to show that I fully support everything for equal rights, and thought it was also important just to be here for my friends.” -Darren McLeod (left), who joined Brumfield, Wang, and the others for the march.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Many attendees wore “Pussyhats,” hand-knitted pink hats that are meant to “reclaim the term as a means of empowerment,” according to the Pussyhat Project’s website.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

“I’m marching for women; I’m marching for the belief that you can make a difference by going to a place and protesting and being heard. And it’s also something about solidarity. It’s nice to be in D.C. where everyone cares about women’s rights right now. Everyone’s here for a similar reason and I feel very sisterly and brotherly with everyone at this protest.” -Alena Klimas, a senior studying global studies and political science at OU.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

This is one of many signs participants brought to the march.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Melanie Campbell, president and CEO of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, was one of many speakers at the Women’s March. Campbell called for living wages, paid family leave and rights for minority groups, among other demands. Other speakers included Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem and Alicia Keys.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

“I’m marching to have the opportunity to be with other people who think that we all need to take a stand and do something, knowing that this is just the start and we’re going to keep doing things.” -Moira Snuffer (left), an OU senior sculpture and expanded practice student.

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Milan Pema, center, went to the march with some women in her family. They marched for science, love and diversity, and Pema said she wanted to raise awareness about global warming and saving animals.

 

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

Photo by Olivia Miltner.

After the speakers ended, the masses of people began slowly moving toward the White House.

 

About the author

Olivia Miltner

Olivia is the co-director of research and development at The New Political. She is in her fourth year at Ohio University majoring in journalism and war and peace. Olivia has interned at WOSU’s 89.7 NPR News and the Central Ohio American Red Cross. She is from Columbus, Ohio, and she loves animal videos. Previously, Olivia was the editor in chief, the state editor and a state writer. Follow her on Twitter @omiltner.

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