Home Campus On and off-campus senatorial candidates tackle diversity in third Senate debate

On and off-campus senatorial candidates tackle diversity in third Senate debate

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Five on-campus and two off-campus Student Senate candidates laid out their platforms in the off-campus and residential debate Monday night. None of the candidates present represented the Fight ticket, and both off-campus senators in attendance represented Green Light.

The residential senator candidates were asked about diversity, connecting students and what issues they believe are most affecting their constituents.

Xan Spalding, Voice East Green Senator candidate, said being a diverse and inclusive environment, as well as creating a community within the residence halls and across the entire green, would help with diversity.

“Just being there with the other RAs and with the students within the residence halls (would help),” she said.

Alicia Lundy, Green Light West Green Senator candidate, thought on a slightly bigger scale.

“I think the most important aspect is the collaborative aspect, whether it be with OUPD or by putting printers in the lobby, it kinda draws more people into the lobbies and provides space for collaboration.”

Candidates from both tickets also spoke extensively in support of inclusivity.

The present off-campus senators echoed each other, as they both are running under the same ticket. Matt Mamone and Olivia Mirich both advocated for on-campus office hours with better marketing, having 24-hour bus loops to help with safety and creating pragmatic solutions for constituents.

“Green Light is the most qualified ticket by a quarter mile. The people who are working on Green Light have connections in the city already…Green Light is the only solution,” Mamone said.

 

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